The Misanthropic Shiba

6 Comments

  1. not all breeders have money in mind. a true good and responsible breeder should be trying to promote and improve the breed. there are tons of people out there trying to make a buck off the backs of animals but it is just as much the consumers fault if they overlook their chosen breeder being a complete ass and buy an irresponsibly bred animal.

  2. LOL. this post got h-e-a-t-e-d!

    I originally posted the Gina S article on my blog because I really believe in GREAT breeders. Not good breeders, GREAT breeders. Breeders who really give a damn about the future of DOG and the present population issue. A great breeder is probably also involved in rescue, and never hesitates to bring one of its own back, thus not adding to shelter deaths. A great breeder also has a spay/neuter agreement with its puppy homes, carefully screened, and thus does not add to the overpopulation of pet dogs.

    I consider myself an animal advocate. I’ve done my time on a farm sanctuary and I’ve been involved in (all-breed) dog rescue for some time now. In no way does a GREAT breeder dethrone or detract from the work done in animal rescue, hopefully they actually relieve some of it. We need both the GREAT breeder and the DEDICATED rescuer to ensure a brighter future for dogs (working/companion/etc).

    Well defended, TMS!

  3. I disagree with your stance, as I believe that our society does not weed out the weak and sick, thus making it easier for genetic disease to flourish by allowing only accidents to produce puppies.Also, working dogs are made, not born. You have to breed for a reliable production of health and temperament. Why do you think the police have breeding kennels? If they could get reliable working dogs out of the general population, they would; it's cheaper. The same goes for guide dogs for the blind.But let's ignore the working dog thing for a moment and look at companion dogs. Responsibly bred companion dogs occupy a space outside of the general breeding-euthanization cycle, as their breeders reserve the right to take them back should the owner be unable or unwilling to care for them. A person who is looking for a specific type of dog isn't necessarily going to get just any dog if they can't find what they're looking for.I realize your position, but I object to your blanket labelling of all people who like purebred dogs and support responsible breeding.

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