The Story of The Brooklyn Bridge Shiba

Brooklyn the Shiba Inu was found wandering on the Brooklyn Bridge.

Yuki the Shiba Inu was found wandering on the Brooklyn Bridge. – Source

Well, people were hoping for more to the story and we got something for you!  Matthew Petronis was kind enough to tell me (Julie) a little more about his adventures with Yuki:

When you stopped to help Yuki, was it hard to catch her?  The news stories mentioned ‘help from some ironworkers’, so I imagine that it might have been a bit of a chase to corral her.

Cross the Brooklyn Bridge on a normal day, just imagine how bad it was when we had to stop all cars to save this poor little pup. She was very quick so we trailed her slowly from the beginning to the bridge to about the middle where work was being done and we yelled out to the iron workers to grab her and put her in the truck.

After she warmed up to you, how did you find her behaviour in the home?

She was amazing, she didn’t bark once, and me being the pet lover I am went to the local pet shop to buy her a pink collar, a shirt, and some treats.

How did Yuki’s owners find out about your rescue of her? News, Internet, etc?

I actually was searching for them and came across an email from an ad of a lost shiba inu under the brooklyn bridge two days after we saved her. They never told me how, it was a more of me finding them and then asking them over twenty specific question to make sure it was their dog.

How did Yuki get away from them? Did she live far away from the bridge or close?

The owners told me she came off her collar and ran away and they were from Chinatown.

This should give you an idea of how far it is.  It's about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) from Chinatown to the Brooklyn Bridge.  This may not seem that far, but remember that New York is one of the most populous cities in the world, never mind the U.S.

This should give you an idea of how far it is. It’s about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) from Chinatown to the Brooklyn Bridge. This may not seem that far, but remember that New York is one of the most populous cities in the world, never mind the U.S.

What about Yuki made you want a Shiba? Are you planning to get one soon?

They are just such an amazing, loving, and mysterious breed. I loved everything about her and it felt as if she loved everything about me from the moment we took her in. She did have a few accidents here and there that I had to clean up, but as for everything else she was amazing. We bought her this medium sized cage which she loved with a little comforter in it. I am planning on getting one as soon as possible. I want a young one so we can name her Brooklyn just like the one we saved and hopefully someone can contact me and give me the chance to save another to have for myself.

Thank you so much, Matthew, for taking the time to share your experience!

We’ve already sent Matthew a link to Jenna and Snickers’ site and the National Shiba Club of America.  If you have any other great NYC suggestions for him and his family, let us know in the comments!

Remembering Bella

Bella

Bella

Remember Bella?  They still haven’t found her, but as far as I can tell, they are still looking.  There is information about the trial up on the Bella page.

It still boggles my mind that part of the problem with prosecuting this piece of shit is that “from the standpoint of felony liability, the DA had to prove Animal Control had clearly made the defendant aware he had an aggressive dog, or prove it had bitten before.  Regardless of what had happened in the previous attacks, Animal Control was not able to show they had clearly educated the defendant about the aggressive potential of his dog, even after 3 aggressive dog calls. “

If you decide to get a dog, I believe that by the very action of bringing a dog into your life, you are accepting the responsibility to educate yourself about your dog, it’s potential for damage and what you need to do to control it.  If this “man” can’t be expected to know that his dog is aggressive and uncontrolled, then why isn’t he in diapers and a playpen with all the other people who can’t be expected to take responsibility for their actions?

Bella’s owners, Steve and Terri Belsley and their new rescue dog, Sammy, live in San Jose, but this is an issue that should unite responsible dog owners everywhere.  I realize that judges have to operate within the law, but the point is that the law should never protect someone from being punished for not doing their duty by their dog.

What can we do about this?  Off the top of my head, I can think of a few things: Take an active role in dog ownership in your community.  Attend city meetings that concern dog owners and keep lobbying for stronger laws against irresponsible dog ownership.  Support laws that focus on the owners, not the breed or type of dog involved – we cannot afford to have the finger pointing in any other direction other than the people who choose to own dogs and not care for them as they should be cared for.

Is there anything I’m missing?  What else can we do or have done to protect ourselves and our dogs from malicious people who use their dogs as weapons?

Lost Shiba post

Bella is still at large: here’s her new website

A lost Shiba named “Mochi” is the cause of a furor over ‘Lost Dog’ signs. A Pittsburgh Shiba owner was threatened with thousands of dollars in fines by an unnamed Pittsburgh Department of Public Works employee. She had put up approximately 1000 fliers in the Pittsburgh area and said that the search for Mochi was hindered by the amount of time she and friends took to take them down.

We here at TMS appreciate the efforts of people who take down fliers if a lost dog is found or a search is called off, but to force an owner to take down the only link she may have to hundreds to thousands of people who might have seen her dog is moronic.

Disappearing Act

Anyone seen a Shiba named Gimli?

Well, what do you think? Is it a four-legged predator or a two-legged one? There’s no mention of any blood or signs of a struggle, but then again, there wouldn’t be with some of the larger predators. However I am suspicious that this rash of disappearances just started out of the blue, it seems. Either a new predator has moved in or a human has decided to augment their income with black market beagles.

I’m pretty sure that all of these dogs were taken from yards or something like that, but the article doesn’t say. It’s definitely a warning to keep your dogs where you can see them. It’s sad that you have to supervise even in your own yard, but there it is. It also says something for keeping a rifle around to kill predators. And, no, I wouldn’t care if a dog thief got involuntarily neutered with a 12 gauge.

Sato has been found!

Anonymous found this long before I did…

Trucker reunited with his best friend

Michael Risinit • The Journal News • January 12, 2008

EAST FISHKILL – Maybe someone will sing this story someday, a twangy lament with a happy ending: Trucker loses dog, trucker pines for dog, trucker finds dog.

That’s the tale of Sato, a 2-year-old dog who left his owner with nothing more than an empty collar and some memories more than a week ago. But yesterday afternoon, they were reunited in the same spot where life went wrong.

Alen Nelson of Denver climbed out of the blue cab of his Freightliner at the Interstate 84 rest stop as the rain poured down.

Fox-sized Sato, a shiba inu, waited in the back seat of a Ford F-350 pickup. The only thing missing was some whisky or a cheatin’ wife.

“Where have you been?,” Nelson said to his dog. “I’ve been looking for you.”

With that, the trucker scooped up his damp pet in a hug.

Sato, a reddish-brown dog, responded with high-pitched, throaty whimpers.

That, in turn, produced tears of joy and relief from volunteers who had spent days searching for him.

“This is all we wanted, just to get him back to you,” volunteer Michele Dugan of Southeast told the trucker.

Nelson said he hadn’t seen Sato since Jan. 2, when they pulled into the rest stop, on westbound I-84, not far from the Putnam County line and Sato slipped his collar. Since then, local animal lovers have searched for the dog.

The trucker speculated that his furry friend, who will turn 3 next month, had gotten confused by the new truck in which they were riding. Sato and Nelson have rolled across the country together since the dog was 8 weeks old.

“He just disappeared among all those cars,” Nelson recalled yesterday. “I didn’t see him after that.”

Faced with losing his job, Nelson had to give up the search and hit the road. A load of frozen bread sat in his trailer and Atlanta beckoned. Later, he had to head west before he could turn his truck back to where his heart was.

“When he walks, he just gets his little feet going so fast,” Nelson said, from somewhere in Pennsylvania, as he was heading this way about 9 a.m. yesterday. “I just want my dog back.”

Nelson knew then that Sato -spotted two hours earlier -was back at the rest stop. And that’s where the skittish dog stayed, as Kathy Hamilton of Kent, Dugan and others spent the morning enticing him with kibble. Hamilton, who is the Kent animal-control officer, volunteered her own time in the search for Sato.

Around 1 p.m., Rob Morrison of Mahopac was able to grab Sato and slide a leash over his head -then into Hamilton’s pickup the dog went.

About 30 minutes later, Nelson blew two blasts on his air horn as he climbed the hill across from the rest area, heading east.

The next stop was his dog.

Sato and Tierce

In chronicling Sato’s adventures and sudden fame, I was reminded of a little incident that occured just – and I do mean just – before Tierce’s and my first show handling class on Monday. My boyfriend had just put him out on the cable outside the door so that he could pee. He was preparing supper and had a good view of Mr. Tierce inspecting the bounds of his tether. Until I came home and asked him where the dog was.

“Outside,” he said.

“He’s not there.”

Not there?! But he was there a second ago!”

The tether stays out all day and all night and is consequently stiff. Sometimes so stiff that one has to work the clip back and forth before it will move into place. The best we could figure out was that Tierce had gotten lucky and the clip had fallen off his collar.

So… no Tierce. We go out to the front. No Tierce. We call, yell and no doubt introduce new and interesting terms into the general vicinity. No Tierce.

Now all the worst things that could happen invariably flood the mind as one is trying to figure out where that dog could have gotten to. A limp body by the side of the road. A little face in the window of a car driving to Elsewheresville. A hole where whimpers can’t be heard. A dog, raccoon or cougar swallowing a curly tail for dessert.

I can only imagine what Alen Nelson is feeling right now, especially having to abandon his pet to keep his job. It must be a comfort to know that a search is underway, but that doesn’t stop the mind from going places where the dog suffers and dies because of one little mistake. And, the dog being a Shiba, that one lapse in attention ends up with the little brat revelling in sweet, sweet freedom and loathe to give it up.

I sure hope that Nelson gets his dog back. When Tierce came barrelling towards me to welcome me back from work, it was at the same time a huge relief and an I’m-going-to-fucking-kill-you moment. Fortunately the huge relief and the imminent show class won out.

Sato sightings

Search goes on for dog lost at I-84 rest stop

Michael Risinit • The Journal News • January 8, 2008

EAST FISHKILL – The 2-year-old dog who slipped away from his owner last week at an Interstate 84 rest stop was seen twice last night close by the highway.

A woman who was driving on Stormville Mountain Road, which runs parallel to the interstate near the rest stop, spotted the 23-pound red dog with a tan belly about 7:15 p.m. That followed a sighting about 45 minutes earlier on Grape Hollow Road. Both roads, as well as the Appalachian Trail, converge near the highway.

Michele Dugan of Southeast, who works to locate and reunite lost pets with their owners, speculated that the dog, a shiba inu, found the rumble of traffic familiar. His owner is a trucker.

“That’s what he’s known all his life,” said Dugan.

Sato, the dog, slipped away Thursday from his owner at the westbound rest stop, which is in Dutchess County and not far from the Putnam County line. Trucker Alen Nelson was hauling frozen bread to Atlanta when the dog, who also answers to Little Toad, ran away from him. Nelson said the dog was spooked by the new Freightliner rig he was driving.

Sato was used to riding in a Kenworth. His employer told him to give up the search and keep on trucking.

Dugan has put up fliers at the rest stop. She is also driving along Stormville Mountain and Grape Hollow roads with the dog’s favorite toy – a plush raccoon – and occasionally squeaking the toy in hopes of attracting Sato.

Anyone who might have seen the dog is asked to call 845-494-1519 or 914-329-6067. Nelson said he was offering a $500 reward.

The Search Continues…

Search continues for dog lost at rest stop

Michael Risinit • The Journal News • January 8, 2008

EAST FISHKILL – The search continued yesterday for Sato, a 2-year-old dog who slipped away from his owner last week at an Interstate 84 rest stop.

Sightings of the 23-pound, red dog with a tan belly have come in from Pawling and Beekman in Dutchess County, which are northeast of the westbound rest stop in East Fishkill.

Michele Dugan of Southeast, who works to locate and reunite lost pets with their owners, said yesterday that she was going out to post some additional fliers and look into the reported sightings.

Afterward, she said, she would check out the rest stop, where the shiba inu slipped from his collar early Thursday. His owner, trucker Alen Nelson, was hauling frozen bread to Atlanta when the dog, who also answers to “Little Toad,” ran away from him.

Nelson, who was just outside Oklahoma City on Sunday night, said the dog was spooked by the new Freightliner rig he was driving and ran away. Sato was used to riding in a Kenworth.

Anyone who might have seen the dog is asked to call 845-494-1519 or 914-329-6067. Nelson said he was offering a $500 reward.

Reach Michael Risinit at mrisinit@lohud.com or 845-228-2274.